5 Ways 5G Will Affect Data-Driven Marketing on bdex.com

5 Ways 5G Will Affect Data-Driven Marketing

With the next generation of wireless technology expected to accelerate device proliferation, marketers need 100 percent deterministic cross-device matching more than ever.

A little girl rides her tricycle in her home, and as she passes a glass window, an illustration of a friendly monster appears. A fashion designer uses an AR-enabled screen to create his latest work. A group of gamers immerses themselves in an all-out virtual battle on their mobile phones…

If you didn’t see the Samsung ad that first appeared during the Super Bowl earlier this year, these images might seem like far-off fantasies, but with 5G on the horizon, they will soon become a reality.

For marketers, the opportunities 5G will bring are nearly endless. Here are just a few examples.

New marketing mediums will emerge

The proliferation of mobile devices has allowed people across the United States and around the world to access the internet, but not everyone with a smartphone enjoys the same level of connectivity. While they can typically browse the web or watch a short video, a host of problems, from a lack of bandwidth to latency, can keep these users from actively engaging in the content they consume.

The arrival of 5G will give mobile marketers the opportunity to create immersive user experiences like they never have before. Think interactive mobile games that allow users to talk and see each other in real time or AR-enabled apps from brands and retailers that allow users to try on clothes in the comfort of their home.

5G will make waves outside of the mobile space too. Better wireless internet will lead to better location intelligence, allowing marketers to geo-target potential customers with coupons, store updates, and more relevant marketing material with greater precision. In other words, getting the right message to the right customer at the right time—the goal of any marketing campaign—will finally be possible on a broader scale.

Of course, these scenarios are only a few examples of how marketers can create bigger, better campaigns and user experiences with 5G. Only time will tell how marketers take advantage of 5G once it’s widely available.

Marketers will have access to more real-time data

5G will boost network speeds from about 100 megabits per second to 10 gigabits per second, nearly 100 times faster than what is available through 4G now. Increased network speeds, along with increased bandwidth, will enable retailers and brands to collaborate in new ways.

Adweek predicts 5G will disrupt retailing by enabling in-store purchases via AR mirrors, distribution of long-form video content via MMS, foldable multi-screen devices and even location-based delivery.

Programmatic advertising will get a revamp

We’ve discussed how 5G will open up new avenues for data-driven marketing campaigns, but the current programmatic advertising infrastructure will also change as demand grows.

Open X, a programmatic advertising company, says it currently handles 100 billion ad requests per day. That number may seem high, but when 5G arrives, brands, retailers, and other companies will request programmatic ads even more. Advertisements will load faster and richer audio and video experiences will be possible, giving brands even more reason to invest in programmatic advertising.

Programmatic advertising costs could change as well. More demand could lead to higher prices, but advertisers and publishers also predict there will be more ad formats and pricing options to choose from as well.

Marketing across multiple devices will be a must

With 5G, more consumers will access the internet on more devices at the same time. While the interaction between devices includes smartphones, desktop, and laptops, smart home and voice-enabled devices powered by the IoT will be accessed more frequently as well.

To reach users across all their devices, marketers will have to identify them. Tools like BDEX’s ID Graph, which uses 100 percent deterministic cross-device matching, will become indispensable.

Marketers that fail to prepare could get left in the dust

It’s important to recognize that even though 5G is expected to change how marketers approach data-driven marketing, it will take years to reach the average consumer. In its downloadable report “The 5G era in the US,” the GSMA estimates 5G won’t become the leading mobile network technology in the United States until 2025 when it’s expected to account for about half of mobile connects.

That gives marketers plenty of time to prepare. Whether your company is a startup or a multi-million dollar establishment, the BDEX DXP has an audience and other datasets across more than 500 industries, making it an ideal resource for marketers who want to get ahead and start reaching more potential customers now.

By combining the functionality and reach of a traditional DMP in a true marketplace environment, BDEX enables companies to create and target audiences like never before. Contact us today to learn more.

Using Real-Time Data to Build Brand Loyalty on bdex.com

Using Real-Time Data to Build Brand Loyalty

Customer marketing focuses on retaining and enriching the customer relationships you already have, and the more competitive your industry is, the more you are going to need real-time data.

At BDEX we talk about how we are building the data infrastructure that powers human connectivity by delivering the right insight into the right people at the right time – to close the sale. But the value of our real-time data goes far beyond that. It can be just as valuable for building customer loyalty as for audience segmentation and targeting.

In fact, learning how to integrate real-time data into customer marketing could be a great way to pull away from competitors, particularly in more mature industries where customer loyalty is critical to sustaining growth. Research from Forrester and DataStax has shown that 95 percent of companies can’t yet make sense of customer data, and thus they struggle to pull any meaningful, real-time insight out of it.

Targeted marketing vs. customer marketing

The term “customer marketing” may seem redundant since all marketing is aimed at customers. But in this context, we are using the term to refer to marketing to existing customers rather than targeting new ones.

Targeted marketing markets products or services to potential customers, not current customers based on known preferences and behavior.

Customer marketing aims to not just retain customers but keep them buying repeatedly and success hinges on integrating data that is often scattered throughout an enterprise. For instance, product marketing and management and account management, as well as the customer marketing team, need to work together to build a single customer database.

Each team on its own wouldn’t have all the information about what customers value most and what brings them the most satisfaction, all of which are factors that lead to brand loyalty. In a study from the CMO Council, almost half of marketers still fail to deliver “contextual, personalized engagements” across points of contact.

Often, marketers can get that context more quickly by partnering with high-end data exchange platform like BDEX, which aggregates and classifies billions of real-time data signals from dozens of vetted partners using a uniform taxonomy to help marketers quickly build custom audiences.

Enhancing the customer experience

The first consideration for customer marketing should be enhancing the customer experience across all touchpoints to create a seamless and immersive brand experience. This will lead to greater customer loyalty, which will lead to repeat purchases and lifelong customer relationships.

A report released from Motista showed that emotionally connected customers are much more valuable to brands overall. These loyal customers spend up to two times more than other customers, have a 306 percent higher lifetime value, and stay with a brand for 5.1 years on average.

So, how do you enhance the customer experience and foster customer loyalty in 2019?

One way is to find new ways to use real-time data to push further toward true 1:1 customer personalization.

For instance, you could layer real-time data signals available from third parties on top of your existing customer data to enhance the product recommendation engine on your online store.  Personalizing recommendations can make the difference between a returning customer making add-on purchases and abandoning their shopping cart.

Or you could make a commitment to omnichannel personalization. This involves using cross-device matching and real-time data to tailor content not just to the customer’s preferences and behavior, but to the channel being used to present a consistent and integrated customer experience. This means adjusting content to exploit the strengths of each channel, whether that be email, text messages, an online store or SERP, a mobile app, an addressable cable TV box, digital signage, smart appliances or direct mail. This capability will become more critical the more humans become enmeshed in the Internet of Things and it’s only possible when you have access to the technology listed below.

Identity resolution

Your organization likely already has a data gathering system in place. But are you using that data as much as you could be? Each data transaction should be linked to a unique customer identifier, which allows you to create a more granular picture of your customers for not just real-time personalization, higher resolution targeting, and audience management, but more omnichannel personalization.

The more data you have in your ID Graph the more you can segment your audience and personalize your content. This allows you to send different messages to potential customers and existing customers so that both groups aren’t seeing the same ads and thus becoming alienated if a message doesn’t apply to them.

Deterministic matching

Deterministic cross-device matching uses customer information like anonymized log-in data or email addresses to match connected devices to Customer IDs and it ’s essential to omnichannel personalization and integral to building a robust ID Graph.

Geofencing

Geofencing allows marketers to draw a virtual fence that will alert them any time someone enters or exits a specific area. This can be used by brands and retailers to email coupons and other content to customers once they get within a certain distance of a store or even a section of a store. The technology provides a tremendous way to connect with existing customers at or near the point of purchase.

Clickstream and POS data

Combining geofencing data with other real-time signals such as a customer’s browsing activity or brick-and-mortar purchases can provide even greater insight into customer intent. This can help you decide not only whether and how to connect with the customer, but what content to send.

The above provides just a glimpse of how real-time data can be used to enhance customer loyalty, boost customers’ lifetime value and improve your marketing ROI.

Why loyalty matters?

Research shows investors are much more likely to reward brands with repeat customers and customer loyalty with premium valuations. That’s primarily because repeat purchasers spend more, refer more people, and bring in more business, according to Bain and Company research. As any marketer knows, it’s also significantly less expensive to retain a customer than acquire a new one.

This is why more auto dealerships are now focusing their marketing efforts toward retention, rather than just target marketing. Real-time data, it turns out, can turbocharge customer loyalty just as much as customer acquisition and sales.

BDEX is committed to building the infrastructure marketers need to power human connectivity. Call (917) 410 6616 or email us at info@bdex.com today to learn how brand-building solutions from BDEX can help you put the right messages in front of the right consumers at the right time.

When Your Audience Doesn’t Reflect Reality: Big Data Audience Building

Marketers understand that you simply can’t build audience groups on pure demographic factors. After all, Prince Charles of England and rocker Ozzy Osbourne are both British males of the same approximate age. However, it’s safe to say that a marketing message tailored for Ozzy wouldn’t necessarily convert the heir apparent, Prince Charles. Consumer preferences, motivations, and needs play a critical role in purchase decisions.

It’s clear that audience groups must be more sophisticated than demographics. Even deep demographic factors like income or family status don’t tell the full story. As Harvard Business Review’s (HBR) highlights, the sorts of audience groups that convert are rarely “created.” Instead, they’re “uncovered” through data analysis that incorporates behavioral clues from cookies, web analytics, user-generated content, and other big data sources.

Why Your Audience Groups aren’t Converting

Despite the fact that marketers understand what’s required to build audience groups, too few brands have segments that reflect reality. Information Week recently wrote about some of the “perils” of big data analysis biases, which can include:
● Selection Bias
● Inclusion of Outliers
● Overfitting and Underfitting
● Confirmation Bias
The term “data scientist” is ultimately accurate. To accurately understand patterns in reality, marketing teams must leverage enormous amounts of data to control against faulty results. If your big data audience segments are based on false positives from too-small or incomplete data sets, you could be suffering as a result. In one anonymous case study detailed by Information Week, a brand’s profit margin decreased significantly as a result of audience groups’ creation that didn’t control for bias.

Do You Trust Your Audience Analysis Methods?
Many marketers have developed some level of big data fluency. They understand some common analysis methods used to develop audience groups, such as clustering or linear analysis. Undergraduate studies of statistics has leant familiarity with concepts like sample size and statistical significance. An abundance of easy-to-use analytics tools allows marketers without extensive technology backgrounds to perform complex analyses in a point-and-click environment. However, a lack of big data resources has forced many marketing teams to rely on pre-formed audience groups from 3rd party vendors that are questionable in accuracy.

One large-scale study by HBR indicated that some 85% of product launches fail because of poor segmentation methods. Ineffective segmentation can have a significant impact on your brand’s profitability and outcomes. If you’re reliant on pre-packaged audience groups that you’ve purchased from a 3rd-party vendor, it’s likely time to refresh your segments. Join us as we review a new approach to building audience groups that convert.

1. Form Segment Hypotheses
Big data analysis for the purpose of segmentation is inherently scientific. The first step is to develop hypotheses about your segments. Based on what you know about your segment, you can develop a framework for analysis.
To avoid the risk of confirmation bias, your hypothesis should be based on known variables and goals. It could resemble the following statement:
Individuals who are seeking a mortgage for a second home are often 30-50 years
old with an income of $100,000 or more per annum.”
A correctly-formed hypothesis serves to narrow your analysis, while still providing room to discover behavioral and motivational insights.

2. Obtain and Combine Data
By participating in BDEX’s  Data Exchange Platform, marketers can gain immediate access to billions of data points in real-time. Marketers have the ability to set their own budget, and access insights on web behavior, preferences, and transaction history on consumers that match their existing contacts. Depending on your campaign goals and objectives, you can also opt to obtain contact information for additional prospects that match your goals and objectives. By connecting BDEX’s marketplace with your data management platform (DMP) tool, you can gain immediate access to fresh data insights.

3. Analyze
Effective marketing segmentation today has little resemblance to the mass marketing messages of yesterday. By obtaining third-party insights, you can gain a comprehensive understanding of how your contacts behave. This can lead to an understanding that your buyers prefer self-guided product research, are likely to have two children, or other rich factors that reveal segmentation without bias.
By allowing big data to form your segments without bias, you can avoid the risk of inaccurate results. BDEX’s open marketplace forum allows analysis with minimal risk of bias, due to the sheer volume of available insights.

4. Launch Advertising
Once you have developed rich, up-to-date and accurate market segments, you can launch advertising to connect with your audience groups. Instead of relying on months-old segments created by a third-party vendor, your marketing team has the power to continually test, iterate, and improve your audience groups.

For more insights on the power of real-time targeting for marketing initiatives with BDEX, click here!

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